Exhibitions

An annual exhibition with a changing theme is held every summer to coincide with the Saturday Farmers’ Market. Exhibition topics in the past have included the Parish Church, the Changing Face of the Market Place, Travel and Transport, Pubs Past and Present, Royal Connections and Cirencester People, Portraits Over 200 Years.

In 2013, to mark the centenary of Bingham’s death, the Trust commissioned local artist, Laurie Plant, to capture on canvas his vision of Cirencester: Capital of the Cotswolds – for Daniel Bingham. This thought-provoking modern work sits in striking contrast to the topographical and narrative paintings of John Beecham (1813-1882), another local artist well-known for his dramatic interpretation of historical events.

2016 Exhibition

This year's exhibition is entitled 'Drawing on Cirencester' - historic scenes of Cirencester over 250 years and explores how Cirencester has been depicted using the most direct and simplest of artist techniques, drawing and is open on the following dates from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.:

21 May
11 and 25 June
9 and 23 July
13 and 27 August
10 and 24 September

The earliest drawing dates from nearly 230 years ago and is by Joseph Farringdon who was a topographical artist known for his series of British views and monuments who visited the town in 1790 and drew the Parish Church. The Gallery is especially thrilled to be borrowing from Corinium Museum a series of bold expressive drawings created in 1814 by the well-known artist Jean Claude Nattes, best-known for his various views of Great Britain.

These include views of the Norman Arch, the Swan Inn and the Bathurst estate. In an age before the camera or mobile phone, drawing was the simplest way to capture the local scene and these drawings provide an important record of the town. Drawings often captured a freedom of expression which a more expensive record – an oil painting often did not have.

The exhibition is brought up to date by a pencil and crayon drawing of Cirencester Church made in 1947 by Richard Adler a German prisoner of war at Sidington Hall. There are also some drawings from 2012 by Cirencester artist Laurie Plant of more unusual scenes as they show his intriguing take on modern buildings in the town, the Bingham Library and St James Place.

Big Draw

There will also be a 'Big Draw' event linked to the exhibition on Saturday, 1 October when visitors will be able to make a drawing of their own inspired by the exhibition. Watch this space for further information.

Heritage Open Days

The exhibition will be open for an additional 3 days (7 to 9 September) for Heritage Open Days from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. We hope to be able to show some additional displays relating to Cirencester’s history during this period as well as run tours of the building.

For further information, please contact:

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tel: 01285 655646.

Drawing on Cirencester, historic scenes of Cirencester over 250 years

 

This exhibition of drawings of Cirencester explores how Cirencester has been depicted using the most direct and simplest of artist techniques, drawing.

 

The earliest drawing dates from nearly 230 years ago and is by Joseph Farringdon who was a topographical artist known for his series of British views and monuments who visited the town in 1790 and drew the Parish Church. The Gallery is especially thrilled to be borrowing from Corinium Museum a series of bold expressive drawings created in 1814 by the well-known artist Jean Claude Nattes best-known for his various views of Great Britain.

 

Contd.

These include views of the Norman Arch, the Swan Inn and the Bathurst estate. In an age before the camera or mobile phone, drawing was the simplest way to capture the local scene and these drawings provide an important record of the town. Drawings often captured a freedom of expression which a more expensive record – an oil painting often did not have.

 

The exhibition is brought up to date by a pencil and crayon drawing of Cirencester Church made in 1947 by Richard Adler a German prisoner of war at Sidington Hall. There are also some drawings from 2012 by Cirencester artist Laurie Plant of more unusual scenes as they show his intriguing take on modern buildings in the town, the Library and St James Place.

 

There will be a Big Draw event linked to the exhibition on Saturday, 1 October when visitors will be able to make a drawing of their own inspired by the exhibition.

Home Exhibitions

holding

Contact Us

logo21 Dyer Street, Cirencester
Gloucestershire, GL7 2PP
Tel: 01285 655646
Company No. 09317378
Charity No. 1163250

 


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